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CoreSinging® Certification Programme Scheduled in London

(London – October 8) – Dr. Meribeth Dayme, the founder of CoreSinging® and author of the best-selling book, Dynamics of the Singing Voice will be presenting a CoreSinging Certification Programme in London this November. “A great combination of teaching and learning methods from an inspirational teacher of teachers.” Nicola Harrison of Pembroke College remarked recently about her participation in a CoreSinging workshop, “How often does anyone get the opportunity to work with a wonderful group of people and learn so much that is new?  This is a totally new approach to the art of singing – and to the teaching of that art.” Three levels of CoreSinging® training will be offered in cooperation with The Voice Work Shop: Introduction to CoreSinging, Intermediate CoreSinging, and the Certificate Course. Upon completion of the program the participant will be a Certified CoreSinging® Teacher and a candidate for further certification in Advanced Teacher and Trainer Certificates. Participants can expect a nurturing and supporting atmosphere allowing one to experiment and observe, learn numerous practical and original exercises, observe master classes, receive a manual and study guide, individual video feedback and debriefing, and a tailored reading lists in the field of voice, performance and energy. Levels 2 & 3 of the course are limited to nine teachers and are available to voice professionals who teach and work with singers at any level or style.   Level One: Introduction to CoreSinging® – November 15, 2015 – Urdang Academy One day interactive course Topics include: The anatomy of the human biofield (energy field) and its application to singing and teaching, Vocal warm-ups that are fun, therapeutic and practical, Dynamic Balance, approaches...

Becoming A Complete Singer

Becoming a Complete Singer: Chapter 1: The Quest Chanteuse a young, ambitious singer is on a quest to discover how she can become a natural, authentic and complete singer. In Chapter One, she visits four singing teachers who are considered sages/gurus. To each one she poses the question: “What do I need to do in order to become a complete singer.” The answers are very interesting. What she learns stuns her. Learning to sing is not quite what she expected. This podcast is the first of a series on Chanteuse’s journey to become a complete singer. This chapter is free of charge. The remainder of the series can be purchased once it is...

Dr. Meribeth Dayme’s London CoreSinging® Teacher Certification Programme

Dr Meribeth Dayme, author of Dynamics of the Singing Voice and The Performer’s Voice is offering a London based certification programme in CoreSinging®. About Meribeth A pioneer in her field, Meribeth completed a Doctorate in Music specialising in Performance and Anatomy. She undertook post-doctoral research at the Royal College of Surgeons as well as teaching anatomy courses for over 20 years. She has lectured all over the world and has taught at the University of Southern California and the University of Delaware. She has made a significant contribution to our understanding of vocal function and many leading practitioners all over the world have attended her ground breaking classes on anatomy and physiology. ‘II’d love to see a list of the people who did her anatomy courses in the 90’s, it’s most of the great and the good of voice science and practice.’ Dr Jenevora Williams In her seminal text, The Performer’s Voice, Meribeth warns that ‘Science is a good servant and a bad master, particularly in the world of vocal performance.’ (2005:Xviii) Recognising that scientific knowledge and analysis can inhibit the creative power of art and imagination, CoreSinging® embodies the next stage of Meribeth’s extraordinary journey. She incorporates five key elements; energy, awareness, imagination, practice and performance. Her refreshing approach is ideal for singing teachers who are looking to use new and creative exercises in the classroom. Meribeth will provide a veritable goody bag of teaching ideas. CoreSinging® is also useful for anatomy addicts and voice nerds who are struggling to find a balance between science and art. It will also liberate performers who feel strangled by technique and...

What To Do When Your High Notes Go South

Let’s face it. It’s happened to everyone at some point. Even thinking of high notes can sometimes block the best of singers. We won’t even speak of the worst of singers who seem to specialize in “southern” high notes. Here’s a plot to fix those wayward creatures. 1. Count all the notes in your song. At the very least there will be several hundred. 2. Now count all the high notes. Ah, but before that you will have to determine exactly which notes are the high ones. Once you have found them, mark them in red ink with a big circle. 3. Now hit those notes. Hmmm…that did not work very well did it? But if I practice hitting them enough?……. No? 4. OK.. Try this. Put reminders that the high notes are coming in the next bar. That will give you fair warning! Oh No! You did what?! What’s that big black thing in your throat?           5. It’s better not to anticipate high notes. By now probably you have realised that high notes are better when they are not singled out for special attention. In most cases they are a small part of the whole song. Your brain follows your instructions and your thoughts very well. Sadly, for obvious reasons, some instructions are better not followed. The brain doesn’t know the difference so be careful what you ask it. 6. Treat all your notes as an integral part of the melody and not as things to be singled out. They are much happier that way. Have you ever heard anyone speak and only practice one word of a sentence more than the others? Doubt it....
Ten Things Real Singers Understand

Ten Things Real Singers Understand

by Dr. Meribeth 1. How to stay grounded 2. Communicating with the audience is essential   3. Distorted faces are only useful for very strange characters   4. Practicing and learning are actually fun 5. Appropriate gesture is part of the story 6. Lip syncing is not for real singers 7 Excessive physicality does not prove you are emotionally involved in the song 8. Drinking or eating the microphone is not necessary   9. Ten year olds can imitate any singer, so what! 10. Being yourself is completely compelling  ...
Thoughts on Current Vocal Pedagogy: There seems to be a lot of old dust

Thoughts on Current Vocal Pedagogy: There seems to be a lot of old dust

by Meribeth Dayme I have been an avid student of singing and vocal pedagogy from the time I entered college. In fact, it was my personal project to read every book on voice in my college library—and I did. It became obvious very early in my pedagogical meanderings that the voice world, even from its earliest days of information, rarely agreed on what something meant. There were simply too many interpretations of how something felt. After all, singing is certainly a vibratory sensation. As we know, how to verbally describe sensation still escapes us—sensation and verbalizing belong to two different parts of us. But the part that wants to put it into words continues to try to do it. This plagues us to this day. There are countless books and articles that continue to try to explain feeling, and it creates yet more controversy. Cleverly, we have turned to science to prove what we are sensing when we sing. So now we have lots of graphs, acoustic formulas, and many discussions of the “technical” aspects of singing. We can retune the voice, show formants, and offer lots of interesting, fun ways to “see” a voice. Yet we still can’t describe the feeling. We doggedly stick to researching and trying to prove the traditional perceptions of vocal technique, which lead us into ever deeper circles and ruts. This is then promoted in the literature and courses as “scientific” truth and fed to students in vocal pedagogy courses who then teach it to their pupils. (This very limited view of science is also outdated by today’s standards in sports medicine, biology and...

Announcing CoreSinging’s 2015 Schedule

(Annecy – January 12, 2015) – Dr. Meribeth Dayme, the founder of CoreSinging® and author of the best-selling book,Dynamics of the Singing Voice is excited to announce the 2015 CoreSinging schedule and the re-launch of CoreSinging.org.   New Offerings “Over the last few months, I’ve given quite a lot of thought as to how CoreSinging can make even more difference to the community of dedicated singers and teachers who offer so much in their own locales, in education, and in performance at every level.”  Dr. Meribeth remarked.  “To that end we have revised our webinars and courses to include simple concepts and tools that make teaching and learning to sing even easier, enjoyable techniques for dealing with outdated perceptions of singing and the myriad of fears that arise in the process of learning and performing.  Fearless, enjoyable learning promotes healthy, authentic singing at every level. The new wave of teachers who understand this are providing us with exciting new performers.” Conquer your fears! What keeps you from being at your best as a singer?  Often, the answer to that question is fear.   Make a new year’s resolution to finally conquer the fear that is holding you back.  Contact Dr. Meribeth for a special session to analyze and customize a practical solution to your problem.  Register for this New Year’s special valid until February 15, 2015 for a one-time low price of $50 for a forty-minute session.  If after implementing the recommended solution(s), if you are not satisfied, your money will be cheerfully refunded. New Webinars Designed for ambitious teachers and singers, CoreSinging offers a monthly webinar addressing various subjects relevant to today’s singers.  Learn something new from the comfort...

CoreSinging Events Scheduled this November in the United Kingdom

(Glasgow – September 18) – Dr. Meribeth Dayme, the founder of CoreSinging® and author of the best-selling book,Dynamics of the Singing Voice will be presenting a CoreSinging workshop and Master Class this November in the United Kingdom. “A great combination of teaching and learning methods from an inspirational teacher of teachers.”  Nicola Harrison of Pembroke College remarked recently about her participation in a CoreSinging workshop, “How often does anyone get the opportunity to work with a wonderful group of people and learn so much that is new?  This is a totally new approach to the art of singing – and to the teaching of that art.” A CoreSinging® Workshop will be offered on Monday, November 3, 2014 at 6:30pm at 1 Aytoun Road, Top flat, Glasgow, Scotland G415RL.  The workshop is open to musicians, singers, and teachers of any style or level, educators and directors, actors, public speakers and voice professionals.   The workshop will feature fun and informative exercises incorporating five essential elements: energy, awareness, imagination, practice, and performances.  The workshop is limited to 25 participants. Advance registration is recommended at www.coresinging.org. A CoreSinging® Master Class will be offered for the post-graduate students of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (100 Renfrew St, Glasgow G23DB, United Kingdom) on Tuesday, November 4, 2014.  While in the U.K., Meribeth will also present a workshop for the vocal graduates students at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama.  Dr. Dayme’s master classes and workshops involve active participation and the audience is invited to participate in small groups and experiment with the same concepts the singers will be working with. “Teaching the undergraduate students at the Conservatoire last...
Back to the future 1: creating new paradigms from the old

Back to the future 1: creating new paradigms from the old

We are standing on the edge of unlimited possibilities for music and singing. There is a new sense of adventure and creativity entering the scene. We are in an age of change and we must be aware and open to it. To some it probably seems like confusing chaos and a threat to the status quo. It is a threat to the status quo! What can we do to be a positive part of the change and at the same time stay centered, and learn to dance and play with the times? Part 1. Where have we been? What has brought us to our current stage? 1. We are moving from a singing teaching system of very private, limited and limiting local traditions and oral tradition/ hand-me-down information of over 400 years to a very different picture where information about singing and music is available immediately and globally. Vocal performance is changing because our exposure to singing has become global and offers us so many possibilities. The old classical system of teaching gave us some wonderful singers for their time. It also gave us some ideas that became more and more fixed and and at the same time distorted as the hand-me-down information continued—much like the game of “gossip” where original information becomes distorted as it moves from person to person. This resulted in teaching that was highly reliant on what was thought to be the way to train voices for the music of the time—such as church and opera. Whole methods evolved based on perceptions of what was taught before we had adequate records and information. You could...

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